News

You’ll never believe what doctors are using to fight gut infections: Fecal transplants

The mere thought of a fecal transplant — the transfer of beneficial bacteria from the colon of one person into the colon of another — is just plain yucky. But for people with bowel infections — particularly those caused by the pernicious Clostridium difficile, or C. diff, strain — the procedure can be life-changing. Washington Post (1/6)

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U.S. Cancer Deaths Decline Again: Report

The rate of cancer deaths among Americans continues to decline, according to a new report. Over the last 20 years, the overall risk of dying from cancer has dropped 20 percent, researchers found. HealthDay (1/7)

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Chowing Down On Meat, Dairy Alters Gut Bacteria A Lot, And Quickly

Changing to a diet heavy in animal proteins rapidly changes the makeup of the gastrointestinal microbiome, according to new research, and the changes might contribute to inflammation and disease in the intestines. Nine participants in the research tried each of two diets, one loaded with animal proteins and fats, the other with plant-based foods and plenty of fiber. NPR (12/11)

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FDA approves faster, easier treatment for hepatitis C

A new medication for chronic hepatitis C that can be paired with other drugs to make treatment of the liver-damaging disease faster, easier and more effective got approval from the Food and Drug Administration Friday. USA Today (12/6)

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Banish the bloat

Bloat is a frequent complaint, especially among women. Though rarely life threatening, it’s one of the earliest and most common signs that something is amiss in the gastrointestinal tract, a long and twisting road that stretches from the mouth to the anus. The Courant (11/22)

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Gut Bacteria Might Guide The Workings Of Our Minds

Could the microbes that inhabit our guts help explain that old idea of “gut feelings?” There’s growing evidence that gut bacteria really might influence our minds.

“I’m always by profession a skeptic,” says , a professor of medicine and psychiatry at the University of California, Los Angeles. “But I do believe that our gut microbes affect what goes on in our brains.” NPR (11/18)

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1 in 3 Not Meeting Colon Cancer Screening Guidelines: CDC

Detecting colon cancer early saves lives, yet only about two-thirds of Americans aged 50 to 75 have undergone screening, health officials said earlier this week. Although the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends that men and women 50 and older get screened, about 23 million Americans — or 28 percent of people who should be screened — have never done so, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). HealthDay (11/5)

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Too Much Sitting Tied to Higher Risk of Colon Polyps in Men

Men who are more sedentary face a higher risk of recurring colon polyps, according to a new study, even if these men break up their downtime with bouts of recreational activities such as walking, jogging or golf. HealthDay (10/28)

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Fecal Transplant Cost Effective for Recurrent C difficile

A new analysis of the cost effectiveness of various strategies to combat recurring Clostridium difficile infections (CDIs) shows that fecal microbial transplantation delivered by colonoscopy is the best approach. Medscape (10/25)

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Gene May Explain Link Between Meat and Colon Cancer Risk

A specific genetic variant might help explain why eating red and processed meat is associated with an increased risk of colon cancer, a small, new study contends. HealthDay (10/24)

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